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Tuesday, August 13
 

11:30am

Lunch
Tuesday August 13, 2013 11:30am - 1:00pm
College of Business- First Floor Atrium

1:00pm

Introduction to Hadoop, HDFS, and Pig
This workshop will give an overview about Hadoop, an open source software framework for large scale data processing, the Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS) and Pig, a high-level language for analyzing large data sets. Simple, hands-on exercises will be used to illustrate the concepts. Please bring your own laptop; a virtual machine with a single-node Hadoop installation will be provided. 

Speakers

Tuesday August 13, 2013 1:00pm - 2:45pm
College of Business Room 8

1:00pm

Large scale visualization with ParaView- Part One


ParaView is a powerful open-source turnkey application for analyzing and visualizing large data sets in parallel. Designed to be configurable, extendible, and scalable, ParaView is built upon the Visualization Toolkit (VTK) to allow rapid deployment of visualization components. This tutorial presents the architecture of ParaView and the fundamentals of parallel visualization. Attendees will learn the basics of using ParaView for scientific visualization with hands-on lessons. The tutorial features detailed guidance in visualizing the massive simulations run on today’s supercomputers and an introduction to scripting and extending ParaView. Attendees should bring laptops to install ParaView and follow along with the demonstrations.

 


Speakers

Tuesday August 13, 2013 1:00pm - 2:45pm
College of Business Room 9

1:00pm

Scientific Computing with Python
Python is a powerful open source interpreted language that has been adopted widely in many application areas. This tutorial is a hands-on introduction to using Python for computational science. The goal of this tutorial is to teach participants how to use Python in their computational workflows.  We will emphasize Numpy and Scipy, Python's modules for scientific computing, and Matplotlib, the standard Python package for plotting and visualization.


Tuesday August 13, 2013 1:00pm - 2:45pm
College of Business Room 10

2:45pm

Break
Tuesday August 13, 2013 2:45pm - 3:00pm
Business School

3:00pm

Globus Online for Research Data Management
The goal of the tutorial is to introduce researchers and systems administrators to the easy-to-use Globus Online services for moving and sharing large amounts of data. Increasingly computational- and data-intensive science makes data movement and sharing across organizations inevitable. The cloud-hosted Globus Online service offers dropbox-like simplicity for big data. 

In this tutorial, attendees will learn how to perform fire-and-forget file transfer, sharing, and synchronization between their local machine, campus clusters, regional supercomputers and national cyberinfrastructure using Globus Online, via both Web and command line interfaces. 

Tutorial attendees will also learn how to install Globus Connect Multiuser on their campus cluster to provide data transfer endpoints to their users. The tutorial will include instruction on using Globus Online via the CLI, using scripts for controlling Globus Online operations; and how to use the Globus transfer REST API, for programmatic interaction with Globus Online. By the end of the tutorial, participants will have the tools and information required to provide their users with Globus Online’s full range of benefits.

Speakers

Tuesday August 13, 2013 3:00pm - 4:45pm
College of Business Room 24

3:00pm

Introduction to NoSQL and HBase
This workshop will give an introduction to HBase, a column-oriented, NoSQL database, on top of Hadoop and HDFS. Simple, hands-on exercises will be used to illustrate the concepts. Please bring your own laptop; a virtual machine with a single-node Hadoop installation will be provided. 

Prerequisite- Introduction to Hadoop, HDFS, and Pig Tutorial 

Speakers

Tuesday August 13, 2013 3:00pm - 4:45pm
College of Business Room 8

3:00pm

Large scale visualization with ParaView- Part Two


ParaView is a powerful open-source turnkey application for analyzing and visualizing large data sets in parallel. Designed to be configurable, extendible, and scalable, ParaView is built upon the Visualization Toolkit (VTK) to allow rapid deployment of visualization components. This tutorial presents the architecture of ParaView and the fundamentals of parallel visualization. Attendees will learn the basics of using ParaView for scientific visualization with hands-on lessons. The tutorial features detailed guidance in visualizing the massive simulations run on today’s supercomputers and an introduction to scripting and extending ParaView. Attendees should bring laptops to install ParaView and follow along with the demonstrations.

 


Speakers

Tuesday August 13, 2013 3:00pm - 4:45pm
College of Business Room 9

3:00pm

3:00pm

4:45pm

Break/Travel Time
Tuesday August 13, 2013 4:45pm - 5:30pm
Business School

5:30pm

Research in Computer Science, Mathematics, and Computational Science at ORNL

The Computer Science and Mathematics Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory maintains a broad research portfolio in computer science, mathematics, and computational sciences, connected by an emphasis on "computation at scale."  Research in computer science focuses on the design and implementation of extreme scale computing platforms and computation use those platforms, including: emerging architectures, predictive performance, programming environments, resilience, scientific data and networking.  Research in mathematics focuses on fundamental principles underlying the use of extreme scale computing systems, emphasizing predictive methods, multiscale/multiphysics, and discrete structures with crosscutting emphasis on data and data analysis.  Computational science research focuses on the application of extreme scale computing systems to address a wide range of science areas, including: earth systems, chemistry, biology, materials science, energy storage, and engineering applications.

 

Vertical integration and sustained focus on energy problems are key values of the Computer Science and Mathematics Division.  While individual researchers have highly specialized skills, research projects focus on integration of these capabilities to address specific challenges.  Taken as a whole, research in the division spans the spectrum from the integration of emerging technologies to science and engineering outcomes, enabling a holistic vision for computing.  While individual research projects tend to have short timeframes, the underlying problems are sustained over decades, enabling a demonstration of the value of fundamental research.


Speakers
BM

Barney Maccabe

Since January 2009, Dr. Arthur B. (Barney) Maccabe has served as the director of the Computer Science and Mathematics Division at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Prior to his appointment at ORNL, he spent over twenty-five years as a member of the Computer Science Department faculty at the University of New Mexico (UNM). He has graduated eleven PhD's and nine Master's students. While at the University of New Mexico, Dr. Maccabe also... Read More →


Tuesday August 13, 2013 5:30pm - 6:30pm
UW Conference Center, Hilton Garden Inn 2229 East Grand Avenue, Laramie WY

6:30pm

Reception
Tuesday August 13, 2013 6:30pm - 8:00pm
UW Conference Center, Hilton Garden Inn 2229 East Grand Avenue, Laramie WY
 
Wednesday, August 14
 

8:00am

Breakfast
Wednesday August 14, 2013 8:00am - 9:00am
College of Business- First Floor Atrium

9:00am

Innovating for Society: Realizing the Transformative Impact of Computing and Communication

Advances in computer and information science and engineering are catalyzing a societal transformation. We are witnessing unprecedented growth of scientific and social data, deep integration of the cyber and physical worlds, wireless connectivity at broadband speeds and seamless access to resources in the "cloud." These advances are transforming the way we work, play, communicate, learn and discover. Investments in ambitious, long-term research and infrastructure, as well as in the development of a computing and information technology workforce, are national imperatives in this new era of data and information.

 

This talk will focus on technological advances and emerging frontiers that are shaping our future and accelerating the pace of discovery and innovation across all science and engineering disciplines. It will also describe how these trends inform the National Science Foundation’s priorities and programs. NSF’s efforts provide a foundation for economic competitiveness and will drive new innovations supporting our national priorities, such as sustainability, smart transportation, disaster resilience, education and life-long learning, public safety and national security.


Speakers
FJ

Farnam Jahanian

Farnam Jahanian leads the National Science Foundation Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE). He guides CISE, with a budget of over $850 million, in its mission to uphold the Nation’s leadership in scientific discovery and engineering innovation through its support of fundamental research in computer and information science and engineering as well as transformative advances in... Read More →


Wednesday August 14, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
College of Business Auditorium

10:15am

Break
Wednesday August 14, 2013 10:15am - 10:30am
Business School

10:30am

10:30am

10:30am

10:30am

10:30am

11:00am

Break
Wednesday August 14, 2013 11:00am - 11:15am
Business School

11:15am

11:15am

11:15am

11:15am

11:45am

Break
Wednesday August 14, 2013 11:45am - 12:00pm
Business School

12:00pm

Lunch/Cray Presentation
Wednesday August 14, 2013 12:00pm - Tuesday August 13, 2013 1:00pm
College of Business- First Floor Atrium

1:00pm

Exploring Emerging Technologies in the HPC Co-Design Space

Recent trends in HPC have forced our community to reexamine the full spectrum of architectures, software, and applications that constitute our HPC ecosystem. Architectural trends, such as heterogeneous processing and nonvolatile memory, are emerging in response to concerns about energy-efficiency and reliability. Meanwhile, applications are being redesigned so that they achieve new scientific objectives, expose prodigious amounts of hierarchical parallelism, and carefully orchestrate data movement. In what we have termed 'co-design,' teams of architects, software designers, and applications scientists, are working collectively to realize an integrated solution. Not surprisingly, this design space can be massive, uncertain, and discontinuous. To assist in this design space exploration, our team has recently developed a number of techniques for modeling, simulating, and measuring these future systems in order to predict performance, power, and reliability. For example, our Aspen (Abstract Scalable Performance Engineering Notation) performance modeling language allows users to compose and solve arbitrary performance modeling questions quickly and rigorously when compared to the traditional manual approach.


Speakers
JV

Jeffrey Vetter

Jeffrey Vetter, Ph.D., holds a joint appointment between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Georgia Institute of Technology (GT). At ORNL, Vetter is a Distinguished R&D Staff Member, and the founding group leader of the Future Technologies Group in the Computer Science and Mathematics Division. At GT, Vetter is a Joint Professor in the Computational Science and Engineering School of the College of Computing, the Principal... Read More →


Wednesday August 14, 2013 1:00pm - 2:15pm
College of Business Auditorium

2:00pm

Break
Wednesday August 14, 2013 2:00pm - 2:15pm
Business School

2:15pm

4:00pm

Computational Biology
Want to have a BLAST doing computational biology? This BoF will bring together like-minded researchers to share best practices 


Wednesday August 14, 2013 4:00pm - 4:45pm
College of Business Room 8

4:00pm

Future Directions of the FRCRC
What do you want FRCRC to become? Join the discussion!

Speakers

Wednesday August 14, 2013 4:00pm - 4:45pm
College of Business Room 10

4:00pm

HPC Needs of Students
What do students needs in terms of HPC training, system access and support?


Wednesday August 14, 2013 4:00pm - 4:45pm
College of Business Room 9

4:45pm

Big Data
What do you do when you’ve got (too much) data? Big Data has been identified as the challenge facing computational scientists. This BoF will bring together students, faculty and domain experts interested in discussing big data challenges including analytics, workflow parallelization, and best practices for analyzing, publishing, preserving, and yes, deleting data

Speakers

Wednesday August 14, 2013 4:45pm - 5:30pm
College of Business Room 127

4:45pm

Computational Science in the Classroom
What do instructors need in terms of improvements to HPC environments to support classroom HPC, and what funding opportunities are there in this space?

Speakers

Wednesday August 14, 2013 4:45pm - 5:30pm
College of Business Room 8

5:30pm

Break/Travel Time
Wednesday August 14, 2013 5:30pm - 6:15pm
Business School

6:00pm

Reception/Award Ceremony
Wednesday August 14, 2013 6:00pm - 7:30pm
UW Conference Center, Hilton Garden Inn 2229 East Grand Avenue, Laramie WY
 
Thursday, August 15
 

7:30am

Breakfast
Thursday August 15, 2013 7:30am - 8:30am
College of Business- First Floor Atrium

8:30am

HPC 101- Part One

In the first session we will discuss the importance of parallel computing to high performance computing. We will by example, show the basic concepts of parallel computing. The advantages and disadvantages of parallel computing will be discussed. We will present an overview of current and future trends in HPC hardware.

 

The second session will provide an introduction to MPI, the most common package used to write parallel programs for HPC platforms. As tradition dictates, we will show how to write "Hello World" in MPI. Attendees will be shown how to and allowed to build and run relatively simple examples on a consortium resource. This session will briefly discuss other important HPC topics. This will include a discussion of OpenMP, hybrid programming, combining MPI and OpenMP. Some computational libraries available for HPC will be highlighted. We will briefly mention parallel computing using graphic processing units (GPUs).


Speakers

Thursday August 15, 2013 8:30am - 10:15am
College of Business Room 10

8:30am

Intro to Open ACC

Audience: A bit of C or Fortran experience is helpful, no GPU Computing experience required.

Abstract:

Using OpenACC directives, developers can create high-level applications to execute on modern heterogeneous systems, combining CPUs and accelerators. In this tutorial you will learn about GPUs and how their high performance can be used to accelerate applications by adding simple OpenACC directives to familiar programming languages.

After an introduction to GPU programming, you will write your first OpenACC program to understand the concepts of how directives are structured and how to use the OpenACC compiler, building and running your program in the cloud on Amazon’s AWS. Building upon this first example, you will create a parallel program using the “parallel” directive. We will then have a closer look at the OpenACC memory model, learning how to manage data transfers both implicitly and explicitly. Particular focus will be on using compiler feedback and performance analysis to guide development, understanding how to manage data, especially in cases with a nested call graph.  This is a “bring your own computer” hands-on tutorial.


Speakers
ME

Mark Ebersole

As CUDA Educator at NVIDIA, Mark Ebersole teaches developers the benefits of GPU computing using the NVIDIA CUDA parallel computing platform and programming model, and the benefits of GPU computing. With more than ten years of experience as a systems programmer, Mark has spent much of his time at NVIDIA as a GPU systems diagnostics programmer in which he developed a tool to test, debug, validate, and verify GPUs from pre-emulation through bringup... Read More →


Thursday August 15, 2013 8:30am - 10:15am
College of Business Room 8

8:30am

10:15am

Break
Thursday August 15, 2013 10:15am - 10:30am
Business School

10:15am

Break
Thursday August 15, 2013 10:15am - 10:30am
Business School

10:30am

HPC 101 Part Two

In the first session we will discuss the importance of parallel computing to high performance computing. We will by example, show the basic concepts of parallel computing. The advantages and disadvantages of parallel computing will be discussed. We will present an overview of current and future trends in HPC hardware.

 

The second session will provide an introduction to MPI, the most common package used to write parallel programs for HPC platforms. As tradition dictates, we will show how to write "Hello World" in MPI. Attendees will be shown how to and allowed to build and run relatively simple examples on a consortium resource. This session will briefly discuss other important HPC topics. This will include a discussion of OpenMP, hybrid programming, combining MPI and OpenMP. Some computational libraries available for HPC will be highlighted. We will briefly mention parallel computing using graphic processing units (GPUs).


Speakers

Thursday August 15, 2013 10:30am - 12:30am
College of Business Room 10

10:30am

HPC in the Cloud
Speakers
EW

Eric Wang

Liqiang (Eric) Wang has been an associate professor (2012-present) and an assistant professor (2006-2012) in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Wyoming. He received Ph.D. in Computer Science from Stony Brook University in 2006. His research interest is the design and analysis of parallel systems. For analysis, he is mainly working on concurrency/security-related error detection. For design... Read More →


Thursday August 15, 2013 10:30am - 12:30pm
College of Business Room 9

10:30am

Intro to GPU Computing with Python

Audience: A little bit of Python experience is helpful, no GPU Computing experience required.

Abstract:

Until recently, the ability to directly program for an NVIDIA GPU has been restricted to languages such as C/C++ or Fortran.  With the release of Anaconda Accelerate from Continuum Analystics, is now possible to write GPU code directly in Python and have it execute natively on an NVIDIA GPU.

This tutorial will briefly cover an introduction to GPU programming, after which we will move to hands-on exercises using Python, hosted on systems in the cloud with Amazon’s AWS.  The exercises will cover concepts such as memory management, easily launching kernels with thousands of threads, and profiling the created GPU code.  We will also look at simpler methods to accelerate Python functions using Accelerate’s built-in @vectorize decorator.  This is a “bring your own computer” hands-on tutorial.


Speakers
ME

Mark Ebersole

As CUDA Educator at NVIDIA, Mark Ebersole teaches developers the benefits of GPU computing using the NVIDIA CUDA parallel computing platform and programming model, and the benefits of GPU computing. With more than ten years of experience as a systems programmer, Mark has spent much of his time at NVIDIA as a GPU systems diagnostics programmer in which he developed a tool to test, debug, validate, and verify GPUs from pre-emulation through bringup... Read More →


Thursday August 15, 2013 10:30am - 12:30pm
College of Business Room 8

12:30pm

Lunch
Thursday August 15, 2013 12:30pm - 1:30pm
College of Business- First Floor Atrium